Issue One

Autumn 2011


Our contributors in Issue One:
 

Angelina Ayers has had poems in The North and the Frogmore Pages. She edited Matter 10 and is writer in residence at Bank Street Arts, Sheffield.
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David Callin
lives, if not quite at the back of beyond, certainly within hailing distance of it, on one of Britain's offshore islands. Dabbles in poetry when he can. Seems to spend most of his spare time in the garden, whether he likes it not, where he is trusted with a few menial tasks, but occasionally slips away to the pub. He has had poems in erbacce, The Journal, Iota, Other Poetry and Orbis, and also online in Snakeskin and Lucid Rhythms.
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Martyn Crucefix has won numerous prizes including a major Eric Gregory award and a Hawthornden Fellowship. He has published five collections, including An English Nazareth (Enitharmon, 2004) and Hurt (Enitharmon, 2010). His translation of Rilke’s Duino Elegies was published by Enitharmon in 2006, shortlisted for the Popescu Prize for European Poetry Translation and hailed as “unlikely to be bettered for very many years” (Magma). Information on his writing can be found at http://www.poetrypf.co.uk/martyncrucefixpage.html Also see http://www.enitharmon.co.uk/pages/store/products/ec_view.asp?PID=386
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Claire Dyer
has had poetry published in magazines and anthologies and placed in various national competitions. She also recently attended the Poetry Masterclass at Tŷ Newydd with Carol Ann Duffy and Gillian Clarke and, as a member of the Brickwork Poets, performs her poems as part of themed conversations in poetry at venues around the country.
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Catherine Edmunds is a prolific writer and artist, with more than 250 published works to her name. Her latest novel is Small Poisons (Circaidy Gregory Press), a gripping work of magical realism described as "the Contemporary Novel for Midsummer Night’s Dreamers". www.freewebs.com/catherineedmunds/
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Brian Edwards
lives in Japan. Recent work has appeared in Other Poetry, The Journal and Orbis, and he is currently working on his first collection. He is an editor at After Literature.
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Janet Fisher
until she retired in 2008 was co-director of The Poetry Business.  Her third collection, Brittle Bones, was published by Salt in 2008.
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Jan Fortune
is founder and editor of Cinnamon Press. She has published four novels and two previous poetry collections and is currently working on a sequence about a ruined slate mining village near her home in North Wales.
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Cora Greenhill
lives in Derbyshire and sometimes Crete, both of which inform her writing. She has taught 5 Rhythms creative dance and writing for many years. Her poetry is currently appearing in The New Writer, The North, Artemis and Other Poetry; and recently in Staple, Tears in the Fence and The Interpreter's House. She also has two self-published collections available on Amazon, or go to www.thirteenthmoon.co.uk
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David Harmer
is best known as a children’s writer with poems and stories appearing in many books mainly published by Macmillan Children’s Books.  He also has a number of collections for adults. David was a founder member of the poetry performance group Circus of Poets and when he isn’t working solo in schools all over the country, is part of the highly rated poetry duo Spill The Beans. He also works at Sheffield Hallam University where he teaches both MA and BA Creative Writing and is part of a pilot project involving the Poetry Society and BGT College, University of Lincoln, working with PGCE students.
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James Howard
is a London-based musician/student, and is also an editor at the website afterliterature.org.
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Larry Jordan's
work has appeared in Pirene's Foundation, Miller's Pond and other on-line journals as well as the print journal Comstock Review. He hails from South Carolina.
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Pippa Little
lives in Northumberland. The Snow Globe (Red Squirrel Press) comes out in October 2011 and Overwintering (Oxford Poets) in October 2012.
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Richard Moorhead
lives in Cardiff. His poems have appeared in the Horizon Review, Financial Times, Mimesis and Anon. His first pamphlet, The Reluctant Vegetarian (Oystercatcher Press) was shortlisted for the Michael Marks Award.
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John C. Nash
has been, at various times, electrician, actor, toilet cleaner, traveller, gardener, walking stick maker, trolley jockey, private detective, middle-manager, wildlife ranger. He has most recently found himself feeling quite comfortable as a self-employed bookbinder and poet.
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Mario Petrucci
Ecologist, PhD physicist and Royal Literary Fund Fellow Mario Petrucci is a multi-award-winning poet and residency frontiersman (Imperial War Museum, BBC Radio 3). “Reminiscent of e.e. cummings at his best”, his work is “vivid, generous and life-affirming” (Envoi). Heavy Water: a poem for Chernobyl (Enitharmon, 2004) secured the Daily Telegraph/ Arvon Prize and is the basis of a celebrated film by Seventh Art Productions; it “inflicts... the finest sort of shock, not just to the senses, but to the conscience, to the soul” (Poetry London). i tulips (Enitharmon, 2010) takes its name from Petrucci’s vast Anglo-American sequence, of which the waltz in my blood (Waterloo, 2011) is also a part. Now on target to reach 1111 poems, these “modernist marvels” (Poetry Book Society) embrace contemporary issues of searing social, linguistic and personal relevance. The poem published here is from his forthcoming collection crib. www.mariopetrucci.com
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Michaela Ridgway
lives in Brighton. Her magazine credits include Magma, Orbis, Other Poetry, The Frogmore Papers, Obsessed with Pipework, Purple Patch, The Ghazal Page and Moodswing.
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Jane Røken
is Norwegian, lives in Denmark, and likes to think of herself as an internationalist. By daylight she can be seen pottering about in her garden; by night she's inventing strange things and writing poems and stories about them.
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Andrew Shields
was born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1964 and grew up in Michigan, California, Ohio, and England. He studied English at Stanford University and received a PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Pennsylvania. He has lived in Europe since 1991; since 1995, he has been teaching at the English Department of the University of Basel in Switzerland, where he lives with his wife and three children. His poetry has been published in many journals in print and online as well as in the chapbook Cabinet d'Amateur (Cologne: Darling Publications, 2005). His translations from the German include poetry by numerous contemporary poets. Most recently, he contributed to the translation of The Bars of Atlantis, selected essays of Durs Grünbein (along with John Crutchfield and Michael Hofmann). He is also a songwriter for his band Human Shields. His blog is at andrewjshields.blogspot.com
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Thomas Zimmerman
teaches English and directs the Writing Center at Washtenaw Community College, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. Poems of his have appeared recently in The Flea, Electric Windmill Press, and The Road Not Taken.